Thursday, 3 May 2018

New Books for 10 - 17 May 2018


James Welling, monograph
779.092/WELL

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Hugely influential among contemporary art photographers, James Welling has created beautiful and uncompromising photographs for more than 35 years. Operating in the hybrid ground between painting, sculpture and traditional photography, Welling is first and foremost a photographic practitioner enthralled with the possibilities of the medium. "James Welling: Monograph" provides the most thorough presentation of the artist's work to date. Since the mid-1970s, Welling's work has explored realism and transparency, abstraction and representation, optics and description, personal and cultural memory, and the material and chemical nature of photography. To date, the artist has been the subject of numerous catalogues addressing his more than 25 bodies of work. Yet no previous book has attempted to link these works and examine the primary threads that run through them all. Sumptuously produced, this volume presents a large selection of recent series, from 2000 through to the present, interspersed with important early and iconic works made in the preceding decades. James Crump, Chief Curator of the Cincinnati Art Museum contributes an extensive introductory essay. Also included are text contributions by Mark Godfrey and Thomas Seelig, plus an interview with Eva Respini, Associate Curator in the Department of Photography at MoMA.

From Hopper to Rothko : America's road to modern art
759.13/COLL FROM

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This book explores the development of modern American art through the works of its signature artists. This collection of rarely seen masterpieces from The Phillips Collection traces the development of American art from Impressionism to Abstract Expressionism. During the Gilded Age, American artists like Julian Alden Weir, John Henry Twachtman, Ernest Lawson, and others developed landscape paintings which set the course for modern art in America. Revelations such as these are common within the pages of this book, which examines Duncan Phillips’s interest in collecting and his promotion of living artists. Including essays by European and American experts, this publication of 68 works by 50 artists presents paintings by Maurice Prendergast, Arthur Dove, John Marin, Georgia O’Keeffe, Helen Frankenthaler, Robert Motherwell, Jackson Pollock, Charles Sheeler, Winslow Homer, Marsden Hartley, and Richard Diebenkorn. Together these magnificent works tell the tale of a nation and artistic expression growing in confidence and diversity.

The Blaue Reiter
759.3/BLAU

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Although it only lasted three turbulent years, the afterburn of the Blaue Reiter (1911–1914) movement exerted a tremendous influence on the development of modern European art. Named after a Kandinsky painting, The Blue Rider, this loose band of artists, grouped around Russian √©migr√© Wassily Kandinsky and German painter Franz Marc, sought to reject establishment standards and charge into a new artistic unknown.

Articulating spiritual values and concerns in an era of rapid industrialization, the artists of the Blaue Reiter were connected by a shared interest in painting, woodcuts, and prints, as well as the symbolic values of color and spontaneous approaches to artwork. Key pieces such as Kandinsky’s Picture with an Archer (1909), August Macke’s Lady in a Park (1914), and Franz Marc’s The World Cow (1913) reveal varying subjects, but all channel distorted perspectives, crude lines, and an emphatic, expressionist use of color.

Queer threads : Crafting identity and community
746./CHAI

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"Queer Threads: Crafting Identity and Community" spotlights an international, intergenerational, intersectional mix of thirty artists who are remixing fiber craft traditions, such as crochet, embroidery, quilting, and sewing, while reconsidering the binaries of art and craft, masculine and feminine, and gay and straight.

Designed by Todd Oldham and edited by John Chaich, this 192-page, hardcover, 8 x 10-inch book features full-color spreads of each artist's work, along with intimate details of selections and artist studios, as well as an introductory essay by Chaich, who curated the exhibition of the same name that inspired this book.

To further examine how queerness informs their work in fiber and textiles, or vice versa, the artists are interviewed by makers and thinkers from the worlds of dance, design, fashion, media, music, museums, scholarship, and more―many members of the LGBTQ community themselves, and otherwise passionate allies.

Girl on girl : art and photography in the age of the female gaze
779.0922/JANS

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A new generation of female artists is emerging who have grown up in a culture saturated with social media and selfies.

This book looks at how young women are using photography and the internet to explore issues of self-image and female identity, and the impact this is having on contemporary art.

Forty artists are featured, all of whose principal subject matter is either themselves or other women. Each is accompanied by a short profile based on personal interviews with the author, giving a fascinating insight into this exciting shift in female creativity.


No idols : the missing theology of art
704.948/CROW
No Idols: The Missing Theology of Art
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The first in the new Power Polemics series, Thomas Crow's No Idols: The Missing Theology of Art turns away from contemporary cultural theories to face a pervading blindspot in today's art-historical inquiry: religion. Crow pursues a perhaps unpopular notion of Christianity's continued presence in modern abstract art and in the process makes a case for art's own terrain of theology: one that eschews idolatry by means of abstraction. Tracking the original anti-idolatry controversy of the Jansenists, anchored in a humble still life by Chardin, No Idols sets the scene for the development of an art of reflection rather than representation, and divinity without doctrine. Crow's reinstatement of the metaphysical is made through the work of New Zealand artist Colin McCahon and American artists Mark Rothko, Robert Smithson, James Turrell, and Sister Mary Corita Kent. While a tightly selected group of artists, in their collective statute the author explores the proposal that spiritual art, as opposed to "a simulacrum of one," is conceivable for our own time.

Art : key contemporary thinkers
701.17/COST

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The last few decades have witnessed an explosion in ideas and theories on art. Art itself has never been so topical, but much recent thinking remains inaccessible and difficult to use. This book assesses the work of those thinkers (including artists) who have had a major impact on making, criticizing and interpreting art since the 1960s. With entries by leading international experts, this book presents a concise, critical appraisal of thinkers and their ideas about art and its place in the wider cultural context. A guide to the key thinkers who shape today's world of art, this book is a vital reference for anyone interested in modern and contemporary art, its history, philosophy and practice.

Rewriting modernism : three women artists in twentieth-century China : Pan Yuliang, Nie Ou and Yin Xiuzhen / Phyllis Teo
704.042/TEOP
Rewriting Modernism : Three Women Artists in Twentieth-Century China (Pan Yuliang, Nie Ou and Yin Xiuzhen) - Phyllis Teo
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Rewriting Modernism explores the significance of Chinese women in modern art through the work of Pan Yuliang, Nie Ou, and Yin Xiuzhen, three artists who were professionally active at different stages in China’s political history. Analyzing Chinese works largely unknown in the English-language literature to date, Phyllis Teo analyzes how the artists negotiated their identities in circumstances that made their status as women particularly distinct. Ultimately, this book offers a fresh reading of modernism from a feminist perspective.

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